I’ve noticed when I’m visiting a college campus with an eye for finding what students like, I’m looking through a lens different than when I’ve visited the campus while conducting business. I’ve been to Texas Tech a dozen times over the last twenty years but never saw it quite like on my last visit.

Texas Tech is located in Lubbock, home of Texas music icons such as Buddy Holly, Butch Hancock, and Joe Ely, and sits at the bottom of the lower plains, only a few miles north of sliding off the caprock into West Texas. It’s home to grapes, combines, and the tallest buildings outside of downtown are grain silos. I’ve always felt as if Tech and Lubbock got the short end of the Texas geography stick. It’s flat, arid, and hot. And when the winds come sweeping down the plains, as happened while I was visiting, it’s time to take cover. Picture a red dirt-out or conjure dust-bowl days; I hope that doesn’t happen often. What Lubbock lacks in scenery it makes up for in grit. Lubbock sits in the middle of the Texas Panhandle. It’s 300 miles from Dallas, Santa Fe, Austin, San Antonio, Albuquerque, and Oklahoma City. Students come from 50 states and more than 95 countries, and over 65% travel more than 300 miles to attend college there.

Slipping into an orientation meeting, I listened to a one-time student describe her campus as friendly and accommodating with activities and something for everyone.  I asked the admission’s rep what she had loved most about campus when she had been a student. She smiled. She said aside from all the friendly people, she loves the thousands of tulips planted for the spring. I hadn’t noticed the multi-colored flowers when rushing into orientation, but I did when I walked the campus. Beautiful!

Red-tiled roofs adorn art-deco buildings west of downtown. Picture wide walkways, tree-lined, and more greenery than the rest of the city, except that Lubbock boasts there are more than 75 parks and 262 days of sunshine. Tech even has a lazy river on campus. There are 550 student organizations, 18 resident halls, and 30+ dining venues. On the east side of campus, across from their Big 12 Football Stadium, are blocks of shops, eateries, and upscale living apartments/condos.

Assured admission is for top 10% with no minimum ACT or SAT. First quarter students need a 24 or 1180. Second quarter students need a 26 ACT or 1260, and third quarter students require a 27 or 1290. There’s a holistic review for student in fourth quarter or not meeting assured admission. http://www.depts.ttu.edu/admissions/admissions-finaid/first_freshmen/

Tech’s total enrollment is 35,859 and the student to faculty ratio is 22:1. There are twelve undergraduate fields of study, over 150 majors, and twelve pre-professional programs.

Cost of attending for Texas students as well as those from border counties in New Mexico and Oklahoma was $25,626/year for 2016-17. Tech gives other residents of OK and NM and cost break too; those students cost to attend was $26,525. Students outside of TX, NM, and OK paid $37,866 in 16-17. Tech has a host of scholarships that can be found www.scholarships.ttu.edu Non-resident students could qualify for Texas tuition and fees if they are awarded over $1000 in scholarships from Tech. That could be an affordable deal!

Students can apply at www.applytexas.org. Check for regular and priority deadlines. What did I like best about this visit to Texas Tech? The people were friendly and helpful. Parking was easy. They made me feel welcomed, glad I was there. I didn’t have an appointment, and by the time I’d parked after speaking with a guard, the admission’s staff knew who I was, and they were expecting me! That’s friendly security. I also like that Tech provides a great education at a reasonable price. Finally, among Texas’ leading research institutions, it feels less pretentious than other universities. It could be their grit, or that they are showing rather than telling.